Psychotherapy and Emotion Research Laboratory

Department of Psychology                  Director: Stefan G. Hofmann, Ph.D
Boston University
                                                 

Current Research


The following is a brief list of our ongoing studies.  Funding for these studies has been provided by the National Institute of Health/National Institute of Mental Health, the James S. McDonnell Foundation, and Boston University.  In addition to these studies, we conduct comprehensive literature reviews, meta-analyses, analyses of archival data, and analyses of epidemiological databases.  For specific information about any of the projects, you may contact the person listed for each study.  To reach any of us by phone, please call (617) 353-9610.

Generalized Anxiety Treatment Evaluation (GATE) Study


This study is funded by the NIH/NCCAM (R01AT007257). In collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital, we are conducting a research study comparing the effectiveness of yoga, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and stress education in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. To participate or for more information, please visit gatestudy.org, or email gate@bu.edu.


Dose Timing of D-Cycloserine to Augment CBT for Social Anxiety Disorder

This study is funded by the NIMH (R34MH099311)In collaboration with Dr. Jasper Smits (University of Texas at Austin) and Dr. Mark Pollack (Rush Medical), we are conducting a research study on the effectiveness of tailored d-cycloserine administration for social anxiety disorder. To participate or for more information, please visit http://socialanxietyboston.com, or email nofear@bu.edu.

Boston Adolescent Neuroimaging of Depression and Anxiety (BANDA)

This study is funded by the NIMH (U01MH108168). In collaboration with MIT, Massachusetts General Hospital, and McLean Hospital, we are investigating structural and functional brain biomarkers related to anxiety and depression by collecting neuroimaging data and behavioral data from adolescents with depression and/or anxiety disorders, as well as healthy adolescents.


From Defensive Responses to Clinical Interventions: Understanding the Mechanisms of Anxiety

This study is funded by the James S. McDonnell Foundation. The goal of this proposed Collaborative Award (in collaboration with Elizabeth Phelps and Joseph LeDoux at NYU) is to bring together basic scientists and clinician/scientists to promote the translation of basic research on the neural basis of emotion and defensive responses to the treatment of anxiety and related disorders.  


Effect of D-Cycloserine on a Short Imagery Intervention for Subclinical PTSD

The study aims to investigate the utility of d-cycloserine for enhancing the effect of a novel psychosocial intervention, imagery rescripting, for women with mild to moderate PTSD symptoms after experiencing sexual assault or interpersonal violence. All participants will receive either standard CBT or a newer form of CBT with imagery rescripting. To participate or for more information, please email rescript@bu.edu or visit www.bostontraumastudy.org

Positive Affect Training and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depressive Symptoms

In this study we are examining whether a novel mindfulness based intervention, Positive Affect Training (PAT), can enhance cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression.  PAT includes the practice of mindfulness and loving-kindness meditation, which aims to increase positive affect and self-compassion. To participate or for more information, please email mood@bu.edu.


Effect of a Brief Mindfulness Training on Distress Tolerance and Stress Reactivity 

We are investigating the effects of a brief mindfulness training on distress tolerance and physiological and self-reported distress on a series of laboratory stress tasks. The study is also examining who benefits the most from mindfulness training, examining predictors such as trait mindfulness, anxiety sensitivity, personality characteristics, and psychophysiological variables.

 
CBT Review

For a complete listing of all meta-analyses included in our recent CBT review, please click here.

Last updated: January 18, 2017